Haring Center

Project ECHO in Special Education

What is Project ECHO?

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Health Outcomes) is an innovative online service delivery model that uses case-based guided practice. The ECHO model is interdisciplinary and connects experts with participants through a hub-and-spoke approach.

For more information, visit the Project ECHO website.

Project ECHO in Special Education

Initially developed to reduce health disparities, the ECHO model has grown to be a powerful player in building educational capacity. The Haring Center is the home for Project ECHO networks centered around special education that engage parents with experts in the field to improve child, parent and family outcomes. Expand the project titles below to read about current ECHO networks at the Haring Center. For further exploration, see Project ECHO networks also centered on special education at the the University of Wyoming and the University of Virginia.

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ECHO in Special Education: Parents, Caregivers, and Family Members

Led by Haring Center Researcher Katy Bateman (PhD ’17) and Haring Center Director Ilene Schwartz, this ECHO focuses on creating a learning opportunity among parents, caregivers and family members with professionals in the field of special education and applied behavior analysis. Strategies and supports to prevent and respond to challenging behavior in the home, while teaching appropriate, prosocial behaviors are taught in the ECHO, seeking to increase access to parent education. This project is funded by the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Administration.

Special Education Technical Assistance and Support in Washington Charter Schools

Led by Haring Center Director Ilene Schwartz and Haring Center Researcher Katy Bateman (PhD ’17), this project seeks to connect special education teachers across the charter school sector in Washington State using Project ECHO. The project implements two ECHO networks: a general special education professional learning community and a Positive Behavior Intervention and Support in charter schools network. Positive outcomes of this intervention include an increase in the capacity of charter school staff to use evidence-based instructional practices to improve outcomes for students with disabilities, and an increase in the amount of time that students with disabilities spend actively and authentically participating in school activities. This project is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Providing Education and Support to Caregivers of Children with Challenging Behavior

Led by Haring Center Researcher Katy Bateman (PhD ’17), this project seeks to provide education and support to parents, families and caregivers of children who engage in challenging behavior. Through Project ECHO, a panel of experts delivers the education and support necessary to implement behavioral strategies and supports at home. The ECHO platform provides opportunities for parents and caregivers to present difficult situations at home regarding challenging behavior to a group of parents with similar experiences, as well as other experts in the field, to brainstorm and develop sustainable interventions. Positive outcomes of this intervention include child, parent and family outcomes, as expertise is disseminated through this collaboration experience. This project is funded by the Rubenstein Foundation.

Collaborations

The Haring Center works with other University of Washington centers and community institutions implementing Project ECHO networks that enhance special education.

ECHO Autism Washington

This collaboration provides Autism Center of Excellence (COE) clinicians with the opportunity to participate in the ECHO Autism Washington program at the University of Washington. The ECHO program increases COE clinicians’ skills in the diagnosis and management of autism using case-based learning, didactics and expert consultation so that they can care for patients with autism in their home practices. Haring Center Researcher Katy Bateman (PhD ’17) serves on the hub teams for both program cohorts as a Board Certified Behavioral Analyst – Doctoral alongside pediatricians working on autism diagnoses. Learn more on the program website.

On Time Autism Intervention

This collaboration between the Haring Center and the University of Washington Autism Center focuses on creating an opportunity for professionals serving children with Autism spectrum disorder under the age of three to learn from one another. In this ECHO program, Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech-Language Pathologists, Early Intervention providers and Board Certified Behavior Analysts learn what each type of provider does professionally and how they can to best work together to create a cross-disciplinary opportunity for problem solving. Haring Center Director Ilene Schwartz serves as the Principal Investigator of this collaboration, which is funded through a generous gift from the Seattle Foundation.

Past Haring Center Project ECHO Networks

Meeting the Need: Increasing Access to Applied Behavior Analysis Services in Washington State

Led by Haring Center Researcher Katy Bateman (PhD ’17), this project offered parent education and support to families of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state of Washington. The project used Project ECHO to increase knowledge and expertise for parents and caregivers on interventions targeting challenging behavior, providing opportunities for parents and caregivers to present difficult situations at home regarding challenging behavior to a group of parents with similar experiences, as well as other experts in the field, to brainstorm and develop sustainable interventions. Positive outcomes of this intervention included child, parent and family outcomes, as expertise was disseminated through this collaboration experience. Check out a video interview with Katy and the Arc of Washington Trust Fund about the project on the bottom of their research page!

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